Archive for January, 2018

Geraldton Country Carnival Wrap!

Wednesday, January 31st, 2018

It was a busy three days of com­pe­ti­tion and for some, the extended break a breezy set up for the Ger­ald­ton con­di­tions! Thanks to the Team and Age Group man­agers who helped coor­di­nate the troops on and off the beach along with all the sup­port of par­ents!

grand parade

Click here to view some of our mem­bers in action in Andrew Mayberry’s images

A few pics from our mem­bers, thank you.

RISE UP Camp Wrap!

Tuesday, January 30th, 2018

Read what Darcey and Jett got up to at this years RISE UP Camp, 8–11 Jan­u­ary!

Board­ing the bus at surf house on Mon­day Jett and I only really knew each other but in a mat­ter of min­utes we had both made great friends with the other 42 peo­ple we were about to spend the next 4 days with. 5 hours later and we had arrived at Pem­ber­ton camp school, we set up our dorms before rac­ing around Pem­ber­ton as we com­pleted our first chal­lenge in our 3 teams.

After that, din­ner, a few hours of ARTC train­ing and a night trek, we headed to bed. 6AM wake up the next morn­ing was hard for some but it was tough luck if it was cause Blair had some “fun” morn­ing fit­ness planned for us. By the end of it I think we climbed up a wall at least 20 times, and some footy goal posts too but we were all pretty stoked with the bush brekky after­wards!

Then we got back into our groups for our first rota­tion. Jett had the Pem­ber­ton chal­lenge, and I had moun­tain biking..and let me tell you now..I DEFINITELY drew the short straw. While Jett was off play­ing with trucks and rope swings, I was get­ting up close and per­sonal with the gravel. It was the last jump of the day before we headed off the proper tracks and it was optional and I obvi­ously did it – and I obvi­ously didn’t do it well. I slipped off the side of it, bounced off the other one, and then rolled down the hill like a Bowl­ing ball. I mean, must of been hilar­i­ous to watch, but the scratches, bruises and later dis­cov­ered dis­lo­cated shoul­der wasn’t too funny. But I got back on, true Darcey style and I did all the other tracks, and mirac­u­lously only stacked it another 5 times! Then we headed to the lake for some team games and some 3 per­son canoe­ing.

A tip for any future rise up participants…when choos­ing the other 2 peo­ple to go in the same canoe as you DO NOT choose boys…you will – guar­an­teed, spend more time cap­siz­ing than any­thing else! Later we fin­ished off our ARTC train­ing and it was a great feel­ing know­ing we only had our assess­ment left. Woooohoooo!!!

Wednes­day, we did the other two rota­tions of activities…and I’m pleased to say Jett had a much bet­ter moun­tain bik­ing expe­ri­ence than me, but I spent my ori­en­teer­ing activ­ity cud­dling baby kan­ga­roos so I won on that one. After the activ­i­ties were done, we all suc­cess­fully passed our ARTC course! And to cel­e­brate we set up a huge slip and slide and every­one, includ­ing the lead­ers had fun being big kids down this mas­sive tarp, and after that we went to the nat­u­ral pool.

I found it amaz­ing how much enter­tain­ment 16 and 17 year olds get from push­ing each other off pon­toons. The big day didn’t stop any­one from danc­ing like lunatics while we played surf-club musi­cal stat­ues all night, and after a few air hockey tour­na­ments, and one last stroll through the bushes with the torches we were all pretty shat­tered and when we woke up at 6…we were all ecsta­tic to hear Tayla was tak­ing morn­ing yoga instead of the dreaded morn­ing fit­ness! Dur­ing this med­i­ta­tion ses­sion I dis­cov­ered that we could all actu­ally be silent for longer than 5 sec­onds! It was a mir­a­cle! After brekky, and a few trea­sure hunts it was time to hop back onto the bus. It was sad say­ing bye to all the new friends we had made, and it’s hard to believe the rela­tion­ships we had built with these peo­ple in just 4 days but it feels as if you have known them for years and know­ing we won’t see major­ity of them until Aussies, or even longer was tough but we couldn’t have asked for a bet­ter group to go to camp with and can’t wait for the rise up reunion in 2019!

Jett and I (I is Darcey, if you hadn’t fig­ured that out yet) just want to say a mas­sive thank you to Mul­laloo, SLSWA, Tayla Tenaglia and all the other camp lead­ers for the oppor­tu­nity and yet another amaz­ing camp!!

Writ­ten by Darcey Brooks

TOAD Camp Wrap!

Tuesday, January 30th, 2018

Read what some of the par­tic­i­pants had to say about their expe­ri­ence, 15–18 Jan­u­ary (pho­tos and video below!).

2018 TOAD Camp, wow! I had no idea what to expect when I signed up, but it turned out to be an amaz­ing expe­ri­ence I’ll never for­get. One of my high­lights of over the four days spent on Rot­tnest was ‘skit night’. All six camp groups had to come up with an orig­i­nal skit to per­form to a panel of judges. I was lucky enough to be cho­sen for the award of Best Actor and received a drink bot­tle signed by three iron per­sons! Another one of my favourite moments was the Great Rotto Race. This con­sisted of your camp group going around var­i­ous loca­tions by fol­low­ing clues and com­plet­ing wacky chal­lenges along the way, some of which included bark­ing into the radios, danc­ing in the street, water­melon Tai Chi and R&R. I also really enjoyed vis­it­ing Lit­tle Salmon Bay and the Basin, where we went snorkelling. There was an abun­dance of sea life and the floor was lit­tered with shells! A trip to Rot­tnest would also not be com­plete with­out a Quokka selfie!

It was very sad to leave as I had made some great friends and had par­tic­i­pated in an amaz­ing expe­ri­ence. I’d like to thank Mul­laloo Surf Life Sav­ing Club for allow­ing me the oppor­tu­nity to par­tic­i­pate in the 2018 TOAD Camp.  You have allowed me this chance to have an unfor­get­table life expe­ri­ence, learn­ing new skills and forg­ing some new friend­ships.  I am very grate­ful and thank you.

Writ­ten by Jake Bat­tle

On Mon­day morn­ing our par­ents dropped us off at the Fre­mantle North­port Ter­mi­nal, ready for an epic week in Rotto! As Mitchell, Jake, Zara and I (Har­riet) col­lected our shirts and hats we went to find the peo­ple we knew. When we spilt into groups we started to get a bit ner­vous as we knew few to no one in our group. On the ferry every­one joined each other in their clubs which was a kind of com­fort zone. When we arrived in Rotto, the days fol­low­ing were look­ing pretty grim. It was pour­ing with rain and we still had to make it to the bar­racks! After a bite to eat, we trekked for what seemed like hours through the rain until we reached where we would stay for our time on TOAD camp. After wring­ing out our clothes and an attempt to dry off, we set up our dorms. After din­ner we did our first intro­duc­tion to our Radio oper­a­tors course. Every­one was really tired… we even caught some peo­ple falling asleep dur­ing the course! We all slept really well that night.

On day two, we rolled out of bed and into our bathers for morn­ing fit­ness. Although every­one was dread­ing it, it wasn’t too bad and we were glad we got to do it on the beach rather than run! After scoff­ing down our brekky, we headed to the bike hire… Hir­ing 76 bikes for a group of teenagers is no easy task! We had only rid­den a km when not only peo­ples bags were fly­ing off the back of their bikes but they were as well.

After a stop at the light­house and Oliver Hill, we finally got to go snorkel at lit­tle Salmon Bay. The water was crys­tal clear and the sun was right out. This is when we knew that maybe the weather wouldn’t be so bad after all. The water was amaz­ing and we all found it very dif­fi­cult to get out! We then cycled to our next snorkelling spot, stop­ping at the town along the way to grab some lunch. When we arrived at the beach the life­guards on duty talked to us about their roles on the island. Our snorkel was awe­some and even included a bit of cave div­ing! After din­ner and another Radio course we were feel­ing a bit more con­fi­dent for our assess­ment the next day… oh and we got to go to bed with a few new friends!

After morn­ing exer­cise, which con­sisted of a long run swim run, and some brekky, we split into our groups to do team games. One of these con­sisted of what turned into an oobleck fight which resulted in the need for a long shower! We then did our assess­ment and all passed, although I wouldn’t want my life to be relied on from some peo­ples radio call!! We then had a talk from the spon­sors who donated $10,000 towards our camp! After some lunch and a few more activ­i­ties at the beach our teams got together to plan our group skits. Mitch, Zara and Jake all had great suc­cess with Mitch and Zara’s team com­ing run­ner up and Jake win­ning the best indi­vid­ual prize… let’s just say that my team was not! After a bit of pack­ing we went to bed, mine and Zara’s dorm had a bit of a scare when one girl started scream­ing in the mid­dle of the night for no appar­ent rea­son until only in the morn­ing we found out she sleep talks!

On the Last day we packed up and cleaned the dorm. We then headed over to the air­port where the res­cue heli­copter payed us a visit and we got to hear about what their day con­sists of and got to look inside the heli­copter! After some bis­cuits we started our Great Rotto Race – which included us hav­ing to find dif­fer­ent loca­tions using clues and putting our radio skills to the test. At some points, we had to do chal­lenges includ­ing board res­cue posi­tion and water­melon judo in front of the pub­lic!! It was so much fun and pushed us all. After our final lunch in Rot­tnest we unwill­ingly got on the ferry to go back to Perth. After a very bumpy and sea­sick filled ride we pulled into the docks, sad that the week was over but glad to see our fam­ily and excited to see our beds!

This camp has def­i­nitely been a high­light of my hol­i­days. I have built friend­ships that I never oth­er­wise would have had, it has given me so many new skills and has shown me a whole new side to surf club. I found it amaz­ing that on the first day we stuck with the peo­ple that we knew and by the last day we were each in our own groups with peo­ple we had never met until the camp. I had such an amaz­ing time and can’t wait to meet up with every­one later this year!

On behalf of Mitch, Jake, Zara and myself I would just like to say thank you to Mul­laloo SLSC, all the team lead­ers who came and every­one involved in mak­ing this camp as epic as it was!

Writ­ten by Har­riet Brown

The fol­low­ing video was cre­ated by Zara Mar­tin:

Video-starter

Festive season wrap!

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL.

Well, we hope every­one has set­tled back in to Club hap­pen­ings after a busy few weeks over the Christ­mas and New Year period.

Below are a col­lec­tion of images from over the break.

Some of our mem­bers in action at the Christ­mas Eve Pad­dle – it was our biggest yet! Our Sat­ur­day morn­ing pad­dlers also had a splen­did day!

Big thanks to our vol­un­teer Christ­mas Day patrol mem­bers – the beach was busy!

We even man­aged to host an Open Water Swim event over the break on Sat­ur­day 30 Decem­ber! Thank you to all those who assisted with the water safety – this is a huge fundraiser for the Club. Whilst we com­pleted the task, we could have done with some extra sup­port from our mem­bers to provide rest rota­tion and broader cov­er­age at the event.

Our New Year’s Eve Party was also a hit, thanks to Dawn and the Socialite team along with sev­eral mem­bers who setup, ran and packed up for a 2 staged party. First up was the kids party – a great dance off and games were played, a good show of sup­port! This was fol­lowed up with our Black and White themed youth and up party – they Club looked great and was a buzz of activ­ity!

We have already had sev­eral car­ni­vals includ­ing the inau­gu­ral Lit­tle Nip­pers Car­ni­val, hit­ting it out in the surf at Sor­rento – life­savers and ironmen/women a plenty!! Be sure to check out both Tony Bow­ers and Andrew Mayberry’s pho­tos – there is action all round!

Dis­ap­point­ing num­bers at Abalone Patrol on Jan­u­ary 13 and lucky the weather was so oblig­ing! Let’s hope our bronzies can step up on the next one – Sat­ur­day 3 Feb­ru­ary!

Also, we hope to hear soon from our mem­bers that attended the SLSWA TOAD and Rise Up Camps!

Finally, we wish our Inter­state com­peti­tors Soraya Lee and Wes Gould good luck at the Cham­pi­onships in Ade­laide, we hear it is a mild 40°C! Watch the action Live online!

Becoming an Official

Monday, January 8th, 2018

So, what’s it all about?

What will I have to do as an offi­cial?

Firstly, thank you for con­sid­er­ing to become an offi­cial to assist your Club. We have many Nip­pers that would like to com­pete in Nip­per Car­ni­vals to help improve their skills. We as a Club, are required to provide offi­cials to sup­port the effi­cient run­ning of Car­ni­vals and to meet our oblig­a­tion of offi­cial num­bers per com­peti­tor num­bers.

You may be required to help call the fin­ish line, round up the com­peti­tors to mar­shal for events, write down the results as a recorder, keep time with a stop watch or even start a race! All these skills are fairly sim­ple and you will be assisted when you first start. Being an offi­cial has the advan­tage of being in the “best seat in the house” so to speak! Mul­laloo NEEDs YOU!

What do I need to do to become an offi­cial?

You will need to com­plete two online mod­ules, one through the Aus­tralian Sports Com­mis­sion and the other through Surf Life Sav­ing. When these are com­plete, print out/email the cer­tifi­cate of com­ple­tion to Dawn Jones, our Offi­cials coor­di­na­tor. When you attend a car­ni­val “as an offi­cial” for the first time, a mentor/assessor will com­plete your appli­ca­tion to become an offi­cial – fact-to-face assess­ment.

We have bro­ken it down in steps, with links to the mod­ules to com­plete. If you have any fur­ther ques­tions after check­ing the below out, please con­tact Dawn Jones.

STEP 1:

Sup­ply a cur­rent work­ing with chil­dren clear­ance (if you need to apply for one, con­tact the office for details). Whilst wait­ing for clear­ance you can com­mence online train­ing.

STEP 2:

COMPLETE ONLINE LEARNING – MODULE 1

Aus­tralian Sports Com­mis­sion (ASC) – online Com­mu­nity Offi­ci­at­ing Gen­eral Prin­ci­ples.

You will need to cre­ate a login with ASC to start this mod­ule. There is no charge for this mod­ule.

http://www.ausport.gov.au/participating/officials/onlineofficial

STEP 3:

COMPLETE ONLINE LEARNING – MODULES 2 and 3

You will need to access your SLSA mem­bers area – https://portal.sls.com.au/ (for­merly mem­bers por­tal)

Either login or cre­ate a user­name & pass­word to login.

Click on:

  • > Courses tab
  •     > Login to eLearn­ing (sug­gest chrome browser)
  •         > Train­ing Library tab
  •             > SLS – Sport (view courses)
  •                 > SLS – Core Offi­cial or,
    > SLS – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial

There is a one-off fee of $35:00, this will be reim­bursed by Mul­laloo.

You can choose either “Core Offi­cial” or “Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial”

SLSA – Core Official

This course is designed as an entry-level for offi­cials. It is designed to be a quick and easy course for those want­ing to offi­ci­ate at junior surf car­ni­vals.

SLSA – Technical Official

Tech­ni­cal Offi­cials are those who choose to ful­fil speci­fic offi­ci­at­ing role/s and who work with par­tic­i­pants (non-bronze pro­fi­cient, Surf Res­cue Cer­tifi­cate qual­i­fied or bronze pro­fi­cient) that are actively com­pet­ing in surf sport com­pe­ti­tion envi­ron­ments. Offi­ci­at­ing roles may include: Marshall/Check-Marshall, Starter/Check-Starter, Recorder, Time­keeper and Fin­ish Judge.

You do not need to com­plete all of the dis­ci­plines in mod­ule 3 but it is highly rec­om­mended to become a ver­sa­tile offi­cial. Each dis­ci­pline will need to be assessed at a car­ni­val.

1. Being a Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial part 1
SLS – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial Mod­ule 2 – Being a Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial part 1.

2. Being a Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial part 2
SLS – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial Mod­ule 2 – Being a Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial part 2.

3. Mod­ule 3a – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial in Action (Marshall/Check Mar­shall)
SLS – TO Mod­ule 3a – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial in Action (Marshall/Check Mar­shall).

4. Mod­ule 3b – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial in Action (Starter/Check Starter)
SLS – TO Mod­ule 3b – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial in Action (Starter/Check Starter).

5. Mod­ule 3c – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial in Action (Time­keeper, Fin­ish Judge, Recorder)
SLS – TO Mod­ule 3c – Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial in Action – Time­keeper, Fin­ish Judge, Recorder.

STEP 4:

Print the com­pleted assess­ment at end of the mod­ules, these are to be pre­sented at the face-to-face asses­sor at the car­ni­val you attend.

When you’ve com­pleted online learn­ing, con­tact both Dawn Jones at Mul­laloo and Andrew Mosel at SLSWA.

STEP 5:

ATTEND A CARNIVAL AS AN OFFICIAL!

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

  • Surf Sports Man­ual (down­load – from mem­bers area – print & bind OR save to tablet). For all the cur­rent rules and setup of the com­pe­ti­tion course, click in your SLSA Mem­bers Area: 
    • > Library
    •   > Sport
    •     > Man­u­als & Tech­ni­cal Rules
    •       > SLSA
    •         > Surf Sports Man­u­als (each chap­ter)
  • Cap colours for WA clubs, click in your SLSA Mem­bers Area: 
    • > Library
    •   > Sport
    •     > Man­u­als & Tech­ni­cal Rules
    •       > SLSWA
    •         > Cap Colours
  • Wear a white long sleeved non-club shirt to car­ni­vals until accred­ited. SLSWA should sup­ply a shirt in due course.
  • Record atten­dance at each car­ni­val in log book (pro­vided at first car­ni­val)
  • What to bring with you to a car­ni­val:
    • hat
    • water
    • snack
    • notepad, pen­cil & pen
    • towel & bathers (great for cool­ing off or for ski/boat fin­ishes)
    • sun­screen
    • whistle
    • jacket (seabreeze can be cool)
    • pro­gram for the rel­e­vant car­ni­val from SLSWA web­site
    • ther­mal rashie for wet fin­ishes at senior events – ski & boat fin­ishes
    • surf sports man­ual, cap colours.

Frequently Asked Questions 

Is the Core Offi­cial course a pre­req­ui­site for the Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial course? 

No. The SLSA Core Offi­cial course is designed as an entry-level for offi­cials. It is designed to be a quick and easy course for those want­ing to offi­ci­ate at junior surf car­ni­vals.

Is the Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial course a pre­req­ui­site for the Senior Offi­cial course? 

Yes. RPL and reac­cred­i­ta­tion will also be taken into account.

Am I required to keep a log book? 

Yes. At all lev­els, offi­cials are required to log each car­ni­val they attend and have their log book signed by the event referee/coordinator and/or the stamp of the organ­is­ing body.

How do I get a log book? 

A log book will be issued when you have com­pleted the online units and presented/emailed the com­pleted cer­tifi­cates to the Offi­cials coor­di­na­tor and SLSWA.

How long does the Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial accred­i­ta­tion last for? 

All SLSA Offi­cials courses are accred­ited for 4 years. Offi­cials are required to keep a log book and attain 100 points within a four (4) year period (the log book has more details on this).

How long will it take for me to com­plete the Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial course? 

Each SLSA online learn­ing module/part is designed to take approx­i­mately 30 min­utes.

The dura­tion of the face-to-face work­shop is depen­dent on your local branch require­ments. Each dis­ci­pline elec­tive will have its own sep­a­rate face-to-face work­shop com­po­nent. Please note that there may be a few weeks between com­plet­ing the SLSA Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial online course and par­tic­i­pat­ing in your face-to-face work­shop.

The offi­cials coor­di­na­tor has tried to allo­cate me the course but can­not find me. 

All mem­bers wish­ing to com­plete an online course must have reg­is­tered and logged into the Mem­bers Area pre­vi­ously. Until such time, they will not appear when try­ing to allo­cate a course.

How much does it cost? How do I pay? 

The course is $35. Pay­ment can be made with credit/debit card only. You will receive an invoice to your email address once pay­ment has been processed. Please note, the Club will reim­burse this cost.

I haven’t received my receipt for my course. Where is it? 

All SLSA online course receipts will be emailed to your pri­mary email address reg­is­tered within Sur­f­Guard. Please ensure you check that your email address is up to date within Sur­f­Guard, as well as check­ing your trash or spam fold­ers.

I can’t find Mod­ule 1. The online course starts at Mod­ule 2. Where is Mod­ule 1? 

The pre­req­ui­site for Tech­ni­cal Offi­cial is Com­mu­nity Offi­ci­at­ing Gen­eral Prin­ci­ples. Click here to access Mod­ule 1.

officials